British Columbia draft-dodger monument in limbo

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musicmonkey
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British Columbia draft-dodger monument in limbo

Unread postby musicmonkey » Tue Jun 12, 2007 9:26 pm

Wikipedia wrote:During the Vietnam War, many American draft dodgers settled in Nelson and the surrounding area. This influx of liberal, mostly educated young people had a significant impact on the area's cultural and political demographics. More recently, servicemen deserting from America's war with Iraq have found their way to Nelson.

Today, Nelson has earned a reputation as a cultural centre. The downtown area is packed with good restaurants, cafes, coffee houses, local shops, small art galleries, and impromptu theatre venues. The primary industry is tourism, and the city is about forty-five minutes away from the site of the annual Shambhala Music Festival, an internationally known artistic music festival held in August at the Salmo River Ranch.


Image

In British Columbia draft-dodger monument in limbo, The CBC wrote:Roughly 125,000 Americans crossed the border into Canada during the 1960s and 1970s because of their opposition to the Vietnam War. Many settled in the Nelson area.

The planned statue depicts a Canadian reaching out to help a two U.S. draft dodgers.

The plan got the attention of FOX-TV News in the U.S. and has come under fire from Americans, veterans groups and some Canadian politicians.

As a result of the criticism, the city of Nelson, afraid of alienating U.S. tourists, has distanced itself from the proposal.


I was just reminded of this story tonight when I bought some beer from Nelson Brewing Company. I like to support that little town when I can and they make great beer Smile

Question: So what do you think? Is the memorial a good idea?

catt
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Re: British Columbia draft-dodger monument in limbo

Unread postby catt » Wed Jun 13, 2007 9:10 pm

i will never go there.

the monument is a bad idea, the draft dodgers are a disgrace
shame on them

Sad

musicmonkey
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Re: British Columbia draft-dodger monument in limbo

Unread postby musicmonkey » Thu Jun 14, 2007 3:40 am

lol. okay mister delaweenie

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Re: British Columbia draft-dodger monument in limbo

Unread postby Mercuryotis » Fri Jun 15, 2007 4:55 pm

I wonder very much what I would have done had I been a candidate for conscription at that time. I agree that its a bad idea though, monuments are for honoring people who have sacrificed something and inspire others to do the same, if they were able to somehow recast the idea, say, in a way that showed that the emigres did what they did for their ideals or for the sake of their families, then it might be worth remembering. celebrating the fact that they ran is embarrassing.

musicmonkey
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Re: British Columbia draft-dodger monument in limbo

Unread postby musicmonkey » Fri Jun 15, 2007 6:47 pm

I guess it's all a matter of perspective and an individual's feelings on war.

I am of Mennonite heritage and a pacifist. Mennonites have traditionally been pacifists who opposed any kind of military service for their members, even in non-combatant fields, but were not opposed to alternative non-uniformed civilian service. My father, uncles and grandfathers never fought in WWII, although I believe both of my grandfathers were forced into non-combatant fields and/or non-uniformed civilian service in the Soviet Union. I'll need to ask my parents more about that.

I recently met a 19 year old man from Oakland, California who moved to Vancouver a few years ago to attend university. He chose Canada with a few of his friends to avoid a potential draft for the war in Iraq. As a sidenote, when he was only 16 or 17, he lived and worked in Peru all by himself. He's a fascinating young man with so many stories to tell for such a young age. I look forward to many more discussions with him.

Wikipedia wrote:A conscientious objector (CO) is an individual following the religious, moral or ethical dictates of his conscience that are incompatible with being a combatant in military service, or being part of the armed forces as a combatant organization. In the first case, conscientious objectors may be willing to accept non-combatant roles during conscription or military service. In the second case, the objection is to any role within armed forces and results in complete rejection of conscription or military service and, in some countries, assignment to an alternative civilian service as a substitute for conscription or military service. Some conscientious objectors may consider themselves either pacifist or antimilitarist.


Wikipedia wrote:The motivations for draft dodgers and resisters are manifold. Some are individuals who merely wish to avoid the dangers of combat (and may otherwise support the war in question). Others have political or moral objections to warfare in general, or to the circumstances of a particular conflict in which their country is fighting.


In B.C. Doukhobor museum will take draft dodger statue, The CBC wrote:Nelson, B.C., didn't want it, but the Doukhobor Village Museum in nearby Castlegar is happy to house a statue commemorating American draft dodgers and the Canadians who took them in.

The statue will be called The Welcoming and will feature a Canadian greeting two Americans with open arms.

The curator of the Doukhobor museum says the statue fits well with the pacifist traditions in Castlegar.

"This idea of Doukhoborism and pacifism is very, very deep into the heritage roots of this area," said Larry Ewashen.

Almost a century ago, thousands of Doukhobors settled in the Castlegar region near the Kootenays after burning their weapons and leaving Russia.


See also:

- Our Way Home
- Blessed are the peacemakers


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